STFU TV Commericals

a feminist analysis of commercials you see on American TV
crazyeasy:

Finally a sunscreen for me. A manly man. A real man’s man. Thank god a sunscreen I can finally use. I have been getting sunburnt my whole life waiting for this. Can’t use the other feminized sunscreens. Can’t risk losing my man card. Finally. Sunscreen in a black bottle. FOR MEN.

crazyeasy:

Finally a sunscreen for me. A manly man. A real man’s man. Thank god a sunscreen I can finally use. I have been getting sunburnt my whole life waiting for this. Can’t use the other feminized sunscreens. Can’t risk losing my man card. Finally. Sunscreen in a black bottle. FOR MEN.

(via j-a-s-m-i-n-e-k-a)

moniquill:

micdotcom:

Inspiring video shows how girls lose confidence during puberty

A new ad is challenging the way people think about “like a girl,” highlighting the effects it can have on young girls as they grow up. Award-winning documentarian and photographer Lauren Greenfield directed the ad, commissioned by female hygiene products brand Always. In the short video, Greenfield show what happens when people of varying ages and genders are told to do specific actions “like a girl.”

Read more 

(GIFs via)

The heart of the problem is this: Prior to puberty, girls are allowed to be children. Some breaking of gender norms is considered cute and precocious. It’s ok to be a tomboy.
As a girl (or person identified by others as a girl) enters puberty, they get sanctioned more often and more harshly for nonconforming behavior.
The reason that girls lose self esteem at puberty is because they’re expected to now be women, and they’ve been told the whole time that that’s bad.

(via bakethatlinguist)

feministdisney:

forgetpolitics:

huffingtonpost:

Studies show that women apologize more than men, often for perfectly reasonable acts like, you know, taking up space. 

So watch this Pantene commercial here to inspire you to stop saying sorry for no reason. 

THAT LAST ONE THOUGH

always weird when stuff like this is for a product, like am I buying empowerment? But if I had to choose, rather see this than some of the alternatives. A positive message like this is one I can stomach!

(Source: youtube.com, via aaandme)

The ad was in a women’s magazine and if I remember correctly, was for a perfume. It featured a white woman lying in bed with a black man. The man’s shirtless back was to the viewer, making only his taut, muscular form and powerful-looking arms and shoulders visible. He was faceless, unidentified. The woman looked sultrily at us from over his mysterious form, satisfaction writ large over her features. She had partaken of whatever delights this man had to offer and was smugly, luxuriantly basking in the afterglow.

The ad copy was, “Take a walk on the wild side.”

My teacher used the ad as an example of how marketers can use certain words and images to convey large amounts of information subtly and effectively. A white woman having sex with a black man? How risqué. The implication: be a little like that woman. Spray on that perfume and feel like the kind of girl who has sex with faceless, muscular black men in ritzy hotel rooms because it’s an adventure, a thrill, a risk, something illicitly pleasurable.

These are the semiotics of race. This is why columnists will trip over themselves not to call Lupita Nyong’o or Angela Basset “beautiful”, choosing instead to use terms that call to mind a kind of savage, animalistic magnetism: fierce, striking, edgy, eye-catching. Words like “pretty” and “beautiful” and “cute” are for white women whose bodies and sexualities are not seen as wild, animal, or untamed. Black men are hulking, threatening, thuggish; white men are charming, sexy heartthrobs with hearts of gold. Brown women are exotic, with their “honey-coloured” skin and their “mystical”, “enchanting” beauty, unlike their white counterparts, who are held up as not only ideal, but knowable and safe. White people are beautiful; non-white people are dangerous.

U.S. elections are run by marketing professionals, the same people who sell toothpaste and cars. They don’t believe in actual free markets or the nonsense taught in school about informed consumer choice. If they did, GM ads would say, “Here are the
models we are putting out next year. Here are their characteristics.” But they don’t do that, because their model is the same as the next company’s model. So what they do is show you an actress or a football player or a car going up a sheer cliff. They try to create an image that will trick you into buying their product.

—Noam Chomsky (via noam-chomsky)

(Source: chomsky.info, via bakethatlinguist)